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THIS 62 PAGE BOOKLET CONTAINES OVER 100 PHOTOS AND INCLUDES SEVERAL PAGES OF PATENTS / APPLICATIONS. ALL INCLUSIVE IS A HISTORY, CLASSIFICATION OF VARIOUS PATTERNS AND GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS.

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THE AUTHOR

 

KIJIRO NAMBU

 

NAMBU MACHINE PISTOLS

 

THE AUTHOR

 

KIJIRO NAMBU

 

NAMBU MACHINE PISTOLS

 

ARTICLES

 

AIR CRAFT WEAPONS

 

 

 

From some 230 BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES,

this literary work is composed of

542 PAGES with

686 ILLUSTRATIONS, including patent drawings and descriptions.

  MORE


ENGLISH

日本

Россия

Espa?l

中文简体

中國傳統

Deutsch

DUTCH

Italia

Portugu?

europeu

Portugu?

BRASIL

한국

Fran?is

 

THIS 62 PAGE BOOKLET CONTAINES OVER 100 PHOTOS AND INCLUDES SEVERAL PAGES OF PATENTS / APPLICATIONS. ALL INCLUSIVE IS A HISTORY, CLASSIFICATION OF VARIOUS PATTERNS AND GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS.

 

YOU ARE  HERE: HOME


 

 

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JAPANESE marine convoy moving through the streets of Shanghai, China, after its capture in November 1937.

The Type 92 [Lewis] machine gun mounted on the cab of vehicle is supported by a portable Hotchkiss style tripod. Note the absence of the cartridge drum magazine.

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KIJIRO NAMBU

Born February 21, 1869, Saga City, Saga Prefecture (Southern Japan]; started his military career at the age of 20, when he entered military academy. He was commissioned Lieutenant of Artillery 3 years later. In 1897 he was assigned to Tokyo Artillery Arsenal. Little was it realized that this man at the age of 28 was embarking upon a career in firearms design that would bring fame to him and respect by his country and other nations.

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The Imperial Japanese Navy, beginning in their years of armament and throughout World War II, relied on the army arsenals for their small arms, [rifle, handgun], requirements.  This would prove to be a grave misjudgment in the ensuing years when the need arose for both military services to become involved in the aggressive expansion of Japan?s borders.

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THE BELGIAN RATTLESNAKE

BY WILLIAM M.P.EASTERLY

 

From some 230 BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES,

this literary work is composed of

542 PAGES with

686 ILLUSTRATIONS, including patent drawings and descriptions.

 

The race was on. In the United States, the Ordnance Department still maintained a conservative policy and though testing of several submitted machine guns during the early years prior to entering the war, rejected all submittals including the Lewis Gun which was proving its ability in use by British and other allied forces. The Lewis-Crozier controversy is a matter of record. Whether the influence of S.V. Benet, past Chief of Ordnance, whose son was a co-developer of the first machine gun purchased by the Ordnance Department, bears thought. The performance in Columbia, New Mexico did anything but enhance its reputation or that of the military.

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MACHINE PISTOL EVOLVEMENT. The Japanese Imperial Army Technical Department?s development plans initiated in 1920 included research into development of Jidoutaju, [automatic short guns]. Initial development commenced at the Tokyo Artillery Arsenal in 1924/25 under the direction of General Kijiro Nambu as head of the Small Arms Works. It would be many years of experimentation, development and rejection by a hesitant Japanese Government before recognition and acceptance of a machine pistol for unit service.


In the late 1930?s paratroop units were formed with guidance from their allied German paratrooper organizations. German emphasis was placed on the need for automatic weapon use by the air troops. In April 1939 General Nambu through his firm Chuo Kogyo K.K., submitted his third prototype machine pistol, [Type III, Model B] in 8 mm caliber to various Government entities. Although it was not considered totally satisfactory by the Infantry and other schools from testing it was accepted out of necessity and officially designated as Type 100. Two patterns were produced. One with a solid wood stock and one with a folding wood stock for paratroop use. They would be issued to both army and navy units. These are designated as Type 100/1 to separate them from a later pattern of Type 100 weapons put into production in 1944. The Nambu firm developed both patterns at Nagoya Arsenal?s Toriimatsu factory. For the paratroop pattern, a redesigned configuration provided a folding stock similar to the modifications made to the Type 38 carbine for paratroop issuance. The stock is separated behind the receiver and a hinged assembly attached with two locking pins on the left side. When released, the hinged stock swings to the right and snugs parallel to the receiver. The overall length is reduced by 476.25 mm [18.75 inches]. A lug fixture for bayonet attachment and bipod was also added to the basic design.

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william m.p.EASTERLY

"Author's Notes"

I AM AN AVID STUDENT OF JAPANESE ORDNANCE AND HAVE BEEN RESEARCHING AND COLLECTING DATA FOR OVER 30 YEARS. SOME MAY REMEMBER THE COMPANY IVY ARMAMENT, WHICH I FOUNDED IN 1958 AND USED AS A BASE FOR MY COLLECTING JAPANESE MEMORABILIA. MY SPECIALTY WAS THEIR AUTOMATIC WEAPONS.

I AM IN PROCESS OF COMPILING A DEFINITIVE WORKS ON THE HISTORY OF ALL THEIR AUTOMATIC WEAPONS AND TO PRESENT IT IN BOOK FORM. I INTEND TO MAKE IT THE "MOST COMPLETE" WORKS TO BE ASSEMBLED IN A SINGLE REFERENCE. IT WILL COVER ALL THEIR RAPID FIRE GUNS OF ALL TYPES: SUBMACHINE GUNS, LIGHT AND HEAVY MACHINE GUNS FOR ALL USES BY ALL SERVICES IN ALL CALIBERS.

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